The Wait of it All

“There is one thing that we can be sure of, even as we wait, God has not and will not forget about us.”

“We have done everything we can…all we can do now is wait.”

This is what I usually say to well-meaning people who, with a smile on their face, ask me about our adoption process. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mind the questions at all. In fact, the other night I asked my wife if she ever got frustrated or saddened by questions that reminded her that we don’t have a baby yet. She said no. We both can see the love and genuine concern that people have for us that leads them to ask these sorts of questions. We don’t mind thinking about it. We don’t mind talking about it.

But what we do mind is the waiting.

It’s hard to explain the feeling – a sort of excitement and expectation mixed with frustration, joy, hope, and a bit of disappointment.

But I think what bums us out the most about waiting is that we can’t control it. We can’t do anything to make it go faster. We just have to wait.

If you know my wife and I, then you know that we and doers. We do things. We get things done. Go-getters are often a step behind us because we have already gone and gotten.

And that’s why this period of waiting is so important for us. It’s why it is so good for us. God will/is/has been teaching us lessons about the waiting, and through the waiting, whether we like it or not.

I did a quick search and found the word “wait” in one form or another in the Bible upwards of 135 times. The most common words from Hebrew that get translated into the English “wait” would be: קוה and יחל. Now, I know those squiggly lines may not mean much to you so let me just tell you what they mean. קוה means- to await, hope; to wait for. יחל means-to wait; to cause to hope. You don’t need to know Biblical Hebrew to see the common theme of hope.

In the New Testament the three most commonly translated words for “wait” are: προσδοκάω, ἀπεκδέχομαι, προσδέχομαι. Their definitions are in the same order- wait for; look for; expect – await eagerly – and wait for; look forward to. Here also is a common theme of eager expectation. I would even say that the Greek words help to “sum up” and complement the Hebrew.

Waiting, more specifically, waiting on God, has to do with hope which is an eager expectation of what will most assuredly come.

So why does the Bible talk about waiting so much? Well, there are a few reasons, but I will just highlight two in this short time.

First, the Bible talks about waiting a lot because it is a natural part of life on earth and we ought to know how we should respond in a God-honoring way.

Psalm 37:7-9  Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him; fret not yourself over the one who prospers in his way, over the man who carries out evil devices! Refrain from anger and forsake wrath! Fret not yourself; it tends only to evil. For the evildoers shall be cut off, but those who wait for the Lord shall inherit the land. (Emphases added.)

While we wait we still need to continue to live our lives, and the quality of how we live our lives needs to be worthy of the Gospel by which we have been saved.

Second, waiting teaches us about God and His genuine care, steadfast love, and kindness towards us.

Romans 8:15  For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!”

Psalm 33 20-22  Our soul waits for the Lord; he is our help and our shield. For our heart is glad in him, because we trust in his holy name. Let your steadfast love, O Lord, be upon us, even as we hope in you.

God loves us with a love that is far beyond our own comprehension. But there is one thing that we can be sure of, even as we wait, God has not and will not forget about us. He will not forsake his own adopted children. If you are like us, in the midst of a wait, be encouraged. He is our shield. He is our help.

He is greater than the wait, and He is using this time to teach us and to draw us closer to Him and to one another. It kinda hurts, but I’m really thankful for it.

Proverbs 3:5-6

All My Hope

Trust me on what I am about to say, be careful who you trust.

If you are anything like me, a living breathing human being, chances are that at one point in time someone somewhere let you down. Chances are that you put your trust in a person, organization, institution, or any other entity, only to see that trust misplaced as you walked away sadder but wiser.

Now, please understand what I am saying here. I am not advocating that we never trust other people, we actually do need one another. We need to rely on our close loved ones, we cannot, or at least should not, do this “life-thing” alone. But, we should be careful who we do trust. Even then, even if we are careful about who we trust, we still should not be surprised if, or more likely, when they fail us.

So, what do we do during the times where we face disillusionment? How do we respond to people and organizations who misuse our trust? How do we even move forward in the midst of our frustrations?

As always, we take our cue from God’s Word.

First, we need to understand that people, ourselves included, are fallible. We make mistakes, we mess up, we make errors in judgment, we disappoint, we sin. You don’t have to look past the reflection in a mirror to find a person who doesn’t have it all together and who is more than capable of letting others down. The Bible says that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23) That means that all of us have sinned and therefore fallen short of God’s perfect standard of living. Therefore, it should not be a big surprise when a human being or a human run organization lets you down. We should actually expect it.

But there is also good news on the “fallible human front.” We actually can be better. 2 Corinthians 5:17 promises that if anyone is in Christ then they are a new creation. The old has passed away and the new has come. Does that mean when a person becomes a Christian they are automatically perfect and perfectly trustworthy? No. But, as we let the Spirit work in our lives we will become more and more like Jesus. As a result of becoming more like Jesus, we should become more trustworthy as well. But again, we are still human. Humans will always eventually let you down.

Therefore, our ultimate and unwavering source of hope must be in God alone. We can, should, and need to trust in Him. He will not fail us because He cannot fail us. Take a moment to remind yourself of these truths,

Psalm 9:10 “Those who know your name trust in you, for you, LORD, have never forsaken those who seek you.

Psalm 13:5 “But I trust in your unfailing love; my heart rejoices in your salvation.”

Psalm 20:7 “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the LORD our God.”

Proverbs 3:5-6 “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.”

Romans 15:13 “May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.”

Revelation 21:5 “He who was seated on the throne said, “I am making everything new!” Then he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.”

The Lord, He is God and He is trustworthy and true. People will fail you, I promise you that, but God never will. His love has, is, and will continue to pursue you. His steadfast love and kindness is literally following you around everywhere you go.

He will hold you in the midst of your hurt and pain. He will guide you when you don’t know where to go. He will pick you up when you can’t move. He will comfort you when you are alone. He will be trustworthy when everyone else is not.

In fact, Romans 5 tells us the beautiful truth that “while we were weak” and “at the right time” Jesus died for us. He provided for our most desperate need while we were weak and His “enemies.”

If anyone is worth trusting it would certainly be the one who gave His life for you.

As I write all of this, there is a song called, “All My Hope” by Crowder that I just can’t get out of my head, so I’ll link it here.

Our trust is not in men, women, governments, organizations, nor Institutions.

Our trust is in God alone.