Pass The Ball

A few days ago, the sports world was rocked with the awful news that 9 people had died in a helicopter crash. The victims were girls’ basketball coaches, mothers, fathers, a pilot, and teenage girls. Among them was soon-to-be Basketball Hall of Famer- Kobe Bryant.

As I reflected on these tragic events, I was reminded of something I wrote back in 2018 that I have found eerily relevant for today. Feel free to check it out here: Life and Basketball.

Kobe played in the NBA for 20 years and through those 2 decades, I can remember cheering both for and against him. His incredible skill matched with his relentless work ethic helped form him into one of the best to ever play.

But Kobe was not perfect. Off the court, he had legal issues that put a strain on his family. While, on the court, he often would feud with teammates and, especially in the first half of his career, was known for being incredibly arrogant. However, despite those imperfections, Kobe worked hard to mature as a person and a basketball player. He worked to repair the damage done to his family and now is remembered as a loving husband and father who championed the efforts of female athletes. In the basketball world, he became a mentor to many young players and worked to repair broken relationships with old teammates. He went from a “punk kid” straight out of high school who made many mistakes, to an elder statesman of basketball and a good role model to many.

His journey to maturity is inspiring and should be seen as a wonderful example.

While reflecting on the recent tragic events I found myself, like many, watching videos of Kobe highlights. I found myself watching portions of his final NBA game where he scored an incredible 60 points. It was the most “Kobe” game I could think of. He took 50 shots, rarely passed the ball, (in fairness because others simply wanted to see him score) and was the hero in crunch time sinking 2 free throws to put the game out of reach and secure the win.

But the thing that struck me the most from his whole performance wasn’t the shooting or the slick moves. It was his final stat recorded as an NBA player.

An assist.

Kobe Bryant’s final act as an NBA player was to pass the ball.

Wow. Incredible. First, that’s incredible because he was not necessarily known for sharing the ball. Secondly, and more importantly, it was symbolic.

In the final seconds of the game Number 24 collected a rebound and then made a beautiful near-full court pass to a young player second-year player who then threw down a flashy dunk.

Kobe had passed the torch.

In life, torch-passing is an essential need. Each and every one of us has a responsibility to teach, mentor, and pour into those that are younger than us.

As followers of Jesus Christ, it is imperative that we are teaching, training, listening to, supporting, and championing younger generations.

There are numerous examples of this found in the Bible. Moses trained Joshua. Elijah taught Elisha. Paul mentored and supported Timothy. In each of these cases are excellent examples of experienced followers of God pouring into younger believers for the good of God’s people.

The Bible also commands parents to raise their kids to know and love God and His Word. (Proverbs 22:6) As well as to share with children all of the wonderful things that God has done. (Joshua 4:6-7)

The church of Jesus Christ needs to invest in younger people. You need to invest in younger people. I need to invest in younger people.

I have talked about the issues of being “Too Young For Church” as well as “Too Old For Church” in the past. Feel free to give those a read.

But the point is, if we are going to reach more people with the Good life-giving news of Jesus, both now and in the future, then we need to be including people younger than ourselves.

It’s all for the glory of our God and the good of our team.

If Kobe could pass the ball, so can you.

Rooted

Over the last few years, our church has had year specific themes that we, as a congregation focus on throughout the year. These themes have served to focus/refocus us, unify us, and motivate us to move forward in our personal and corporate relationships with God.

We are surrounded by a culture that is constantly shifting. Right is called wrong, the truth is despised, and people are pressured into comprising their values. This is the cultural reality that we find ourselves ministering in the midst of. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that we, the Church of Jesus Christ, stand firmly grounded in the truth of God’s Word.

We must remain Rooted.

  • Rooted in the Word.
  • Rooted in faith.
  • Rooted in love.
  • Rooted in hope.
  • Rooted in the Gospel.

My church’s theme this year is one that can be developed throughout the entire year in a wide variety of ways. In fact, in many ways, the theme of Rooted is simply a cumulation of what we, as a church, have been working towards over the last few years.

We desire to Know God—Read and Pray (2016)

We desire to Grow in our relationships with Him – Walk Worthy (2017)

We desire to Go and spread the good news – Beyond the Walls (2018)

We desire to Remain knowing, growing, and going – Rooted

The idea of remaining Rooted can easily and consistently be applied to both the individual as well as the church as a whole throughout the year.

We as individuals are challenged and encouraged to stay Rooted in holding onto our faith and digging into the Word. The church, as a whole, is challenged and encouraged to remain Rooted as the Bride of Christ even as the culture around us quickly shifts.

We can, thankfully, produce a message of stability and consistency no matter what sort of uncertainty lies ahead, we can show that our foundations are unshakable.

Today, next week, and for the rest of the year, my prayer for you is that you remain firmly rooted.

“Therefore, as you received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk in him, rooted and built up in him and established in the faith, just as you were taught, abounding in thanksgiving.”      -Colossians 2:6-7

While I Was Reading

I am currently re-reading one of my favorite books, The Lord Of The Rings. Although it was broken up into, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King. Tolkien himself always intended for it to be a single book. If you have never read this literary masterpiece I highly recommend it!

Anyway, while I have been reading I have, again, realized just how quotable Tolkien is and how deeply relatable his characters are. As I read for fun I don’t want to read to just simply escape reality. (Read my thoughts on that topic here.) Instead, I want to read everything, even fiction, with purpose. I want my stories to teach me something and remind me of my own reality. (The good stories will always do just that.) Today, I wanted to share a couple of quotes with you that recently impacted me.

The first quote is the ever-wise Gandalf in response to Frodo’s questioning why he was chosen for such a great task.

“‘Why was I chosen?’ ‘Such questions cannot be answered,’ said Gandalf. ‘You may be sure that it was not for any merit that others do not possess: not for power or wisdom, at any rate. But you have been chosen, and you must, therefore, use such strength and heart and wits as you have.’”

These words greatly remind me of God’s interaction with Abraham in Genesis 12-17. God chose Abraham, not because he was a great man of great strength with great faith or great stature. God just simply chose him. After God chose Abraham He blessed him and, in turn, used him to bless the entire world. Similarly, God chose and used Moses, imperfections and all, to lead His people out of captivity and right up to the doorstep of the Promised Land.

In the New Testament, in Romans 8:30 and Ephesians 2:8-9 we find that God is consistent. People are not saved because of personal merit or works, but rather by the grace of God alone. And Ephesians 2:10 encourages those that have been chosen and saved by grace to produce “good works” as a result.

Frodo was very weak; however, he was still “chosen” for a great purpose -to destroy the evil ring. We are very weak; however, we have still been chosen for a great purpose -to glorify God and to tell the world about Jesus and His love.

The second quote I want to bring up is spoken by Aragorn when he is trying to ignite courage in the face of almost certain doom.

“Deeds will not be less valiant because they are unpraised.”

As I read this I can’t help but ask myself the question, “Do I do what I do to get recognition and pats on the back? Or do I do it because God has called me to faithfully serve Him?”

Galatians 1:10 makes it clear that if our intentions are to please people then we cannot truly be servants of Christ. And Colossians 3:23 says, “Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men.”

We need to do the right thing even if no one is watching and waiting to sing our praises.

The reality is that God is always watching, and His opinion of us is all that really matters anyway. Everything that we think, say, and do should be for God’s glory even when its not popular and especially when we do not receive recognition for it.

The purpose of sharing these quotes is to first, show how they remind me of great truth found in God’s Word. The second reason is to remind all of us how we can take everyday life and situations and think of them with a biblical mindset. That’s why I created this blog in the first place. Everyday life from a biblical perspective.

What is something that you have read, or seen, or heard lately that reminds you of our awesome God?

Use Every Moment

One week ago, the year Two Thousand and Nineteen began. It is hard to wrap my mind around how quickly time flies and yet how slowly it can crawl.

It seems as though just yesterday we were ringing in a new decade. At the same time, 2015 seems like an eternity ago.

Everything happens, and nothing changes as time marches on. Ok. Maybe I am being too deep for a blog, but I am blasting an epic Hans Zimmer playlist while I write this so maybe that has something to do with it. But the point remains, time moves forward whether we are ready for it to or not.

And as I sit and think about this new year that is already a week old I can’t help but think about Ephesians 5:15-16. It says, “Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise, making the best use of the time because the days are evil.”

The days in which we live, and the days that Paul lived as well since he wrote that, are evil. Therefore, we cannot afford to waste any time doing the things that do not matter. We must live and act wisely with the time that we do have.

In Psalm 90, the Psalmist asks God to “teach us to number our days that we may gain a heart of wisdom.” And Psalm 39 reminds us that our time here on earth is small and limited but that our hope is still in the Lord. Colossians 4:5 reminds us to wisely use every opportunity we have when encountering those who do not know Jesus.

Each moment that we have here, in this life, is precious.

  • The moment when you welcome your spouse home and ask about their day.
  • The moment when you greet an old friend.
  • The moment when a family member reminds you of their love for you.
  • The moment when you look at the sky and appreciate God’s incredibly beautiful creation.
  • The moment when God reveals an exciting truth to you in His Word.
  • The moment where you thank God for your stressful job.
  • The moment when a coworker asks you about your faith.
  • The moment when you show kindness to a stranger.
  • The moment that you realize that God has faithfully been with you through every single one of your life’s moments.

We have so many opportunities in life to do something that matters. We can encourage, bless, love, pray, share, act justly, and so on. But as much as we have an almost uncountable amount of opportunities, we must also realize that today we have fewer opportunities than we did yesterday.

We must make each day count.

We must live each day for Jesus.

We must refuse to waste our lives.