Don’t Forget To Remember

Recently, I was on a plane with not much to do so I decided that I was going to pass my time remembering. I allowed my mind to travel back to a specific date and location. I sat there as I remembered the people who were around me, what I was feeling, and what my outlook on life was at that specific point. Some of my memories were sweet and left me feeling warm while others made me cringe from embarrassment. Either way, I enjoyed remembering.

It is a good thing to remember the past.

I have been to many different places in my life and they all have one thing in common. No matter if I am in a big city, small town, or even a middle-of-nowhere wilderness I can always find some sort of memorial. A small sign, plaque, statue, monument, stones, engraving-all these can be found. And they all have one of three messages… “Don’t forget this person.” Or “Don’t forget this thing that happened.” Or “Don’t forget this person that did this thing.”

So why is remembering so important? Because most of the time forgetting can have tragic results.

Now, I’m not simply talking about misplacing your keys (although that can be a bit of a bummer.) I am more so talking about forgetting the people, events, and truths that have shaped you into who you are today.

Deuteronomy 8:11-14 says,

“Be careful that you do not forget the Lord your God, failing to observe his commands, his laws and his decrees that I am giving you this day. Otherwise, when you eat and are satisfied, when you build fine houses and settle down, and when your herds and flocks grow large and your silver and gold increase and all you have is multiplied, then your heart will become proud and you will forget the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.”

See, God completely understands our human tendencies. We are forgetful and prideful people. God tells the people of Israel to remember the person-God, the event-God bringing them out from slavery, and the truth-God did it and it was not by their own power.

And then in verse 19, God gives them the tragic results of not remembering, “if you ever forget the Lord your God and follow other gods and worship and bow down to them…you will surely be destroyed.”

Remembering is serious business. It can literally be the difference between life and death.

There are so many tragedies in history that we need to remember.

The Original Fall of Mankind, The Holocaust, soldiers who bravely gave their lives protecting the oppressed, 9/11, The Sandy Hook Massacre, The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, multiple Genocides, and sadly I have only named a few. But all of these need to be remembered.

But also, triumphs should be remembered as well.

Jesus Rising from the dead, the crumbling of the Berlin Wall, walking on the Moon, cures for terrible diseases, The Emancipation Proclamation, Israel becoming a nation again, and the Bears winning the Super Bowl in 2020. (That last one hasn’t happened yet, but I am hoping that one day I will be able to remember it.)

In the same way that we should remember history-defining events, we should also remember our own life-changing events.

I remember when I was trapped and chained by sin. But, Praise God, I also remember when I put my trust in Jesus.

I remember those countless times where I had fears and doubts. But Praise God, I also remember those countless times where God firmly yet gently pulled me through.

I remember when I was unfaithful to the God who loves me. But, Praise God, I remember when He continued to be faithful in spite of myself.

Don’t forget the important stuff in life.

Write things down in a journal. Take pictures. Create something to put in your house.

But whatever you do, remember.

Thinking of Others

In order for a commercial to be successful, it needs to communicate to the audience what the product is, why the audience should need or want it, and cause the audience to remember the product so that a purchase can be made. Companies usually accomplish these goals by either appealing to our humor or by tugging on our heartstrings.

Every once in a while a commercial will grab my attention, not because of the product being peddled, but rather because of the underlying message in the ad. These messages can be intentional or completely by accident. Either way, I do appreciate when the message is positive.  A while back I wrote about McDonald’s subtle, fresh, and positive perspective on The Importance of Dads. And now, the Golden Arches have delivered once again.

Just the other day I came across a commercial for a new product that McDonald’s was introducing. It began with a kindly elderly man ordering at a drive-through. He was alone in the car and yet he ordered two coffees. After a brief pause, he then ordered way-too-many orders of the new product being introduced.

When he pulled forward to collect his order the employee said something along the lines of, “wow you must really like these things!” And the man responded with, “oh, they’re not for me…they’re for them.” And just then he looked in his rearview mirror and the camera pans to a tired looking dad with a car full of energetic and loud pre-teen girls enthusiastically singing a song.

Perhaps the funniest part is when the song lyrics play “I’m losing my mind just a little.” We, the audience, are treated to a zoomed in shot of the dad wearily mouthing the words.

But that’s not what drew me to this particular ad. I remember this commercial because of the underlying message.

It is good to think about someone other than yourself.

The kind old man bought breakfast for a family he, more than likely, had never met before. And he supplied some much-needed coffee to a weary parent. And it made me think…

How often am I putting the needs of others before my own?

How often am I kind to others while expecting nothing in return?

Luke 6:31 records Jesus’ words, “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” And Philippians 2:3 says that we ought to count others as more significant than ourselves. Colossians 3:12 urges believers to “clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience.”

Now you may be thinking, “ok slow down this is just a fast food commercial.” And yes, you’re right it is. But I also think that small and silly little things like commercials can cause us to stop and do some serious self-evaluation. Do we care about others enough to go out of our way for them or are we too self-absorbed to even notice?

Jesus tells us in Matthew 22 that the greatest commandment is to love God with all our heart and soul and mind and strength. And then He says, “and the second [greatest commandment] is like the first, that you love your neighbor as yourself.”

Now, am I saying that in order to love others you need to buy them McDonalds? No, not necessarily. But what I am saying is that there is a Biblical mandate for us to love others.

We are called to show kindness, to love and care for people, and to put others before ourselves.

I am grateful that a silly commercial can remind us of those truths.

I pray that we all would be kind and love like Jesus loves each and every day….even when we are not in a drive-through line.

Too Old For Church??

This last week I wrote about the role of youth in the church. I answered the question is anyone Too Young For Church? And writing about that got me thinking. Youth are not the only segment of church population that unfairly are marginalized or flippantly brushed to the side.

Just as young people are vitally important to the body of Christ, so are those with many more years under their belts.

I once heard a wise pastor say, “if you have breath, God has a purpose for you. And if you are sitting in this service and are not yet dead, we, the Body of Christ, need you.

I firmly believe that the elderly are truly invaluable to the church. Young people are foolish if they despise the wisdom, experience, fellowship, friendship, love, and guidance of their older brothers and sisters.

Proverbs 16:31 proudly proclaims, “Gray hair is a crown of splendor, it is attained in the way of righteousness.”

Leviticus 19:32 commands, “Stand up in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly and revere your God.”

1 Timothy 5:1 instructs, “Do not rebuke an older man harshly, but exhort him as if he were your father.”

Moses was 80 when he led the Israelites out of Egypt. He faithfully led them for an additional 40 years before he died.

Joshua was in his late 70s when he took over for Moses. He led the Children of God as they conquered the Promised Land until he was 110 years young.

Eunice and Lois, Timothy’s mother and grandmother are praised in 2 Timothy 1:5 for bringing up the young future pastor in a godly way.

Anna, who Luke in Luke chapter 2 describes as a woman “advanced in years” was so faithfully looking forward to The Messiah that she worshiped in the Temple day and night.

Elizabeth was well past her “child-bearing age” but because of she was righteous before God she was finally able to conceive and be the mother of John the Baptist who spectacularly prepared the way for Jesus Himself.

I could go on and on talking about all the incredible things that God has chosen to do through faithful elderly saints.

The point from last week remains. No matter what age you are, God can use you for His glory and for the good of the Body of Christ.

Just as the Body is deprived if young people are not championed, so too is the church deprived if the elderly are forgotten.

Once again, I bring us back to 1 Corinthians 12:12-27. We need to always remember that there is one Body, but many parts. Even if those parts have been around for quite a while, they are still just as much of an indispensable part of the Body as you are.

Young people, do not despise or ignore those older than you.

Old people, do not despise or ignore those younger than you.

Will generations frustrate one another, and will there be friction as we strive to understand one another? Yes, almost assuredly. But is that any excuse for us to huddle in our own age-cliques? No, not at all.

Together, can we work to be sure that Christ is glorified both in the church and on the earth? Absolutely.

I need believers younger than me. I need believers older than me. And we all need Jesus.

Too Young For Chruch?

Recently, someone (who doesn’t go to my church and I don’t know well) asked me what my thoughts were concerning the roles of “youth and children” in churches. They even went as far as to imply that young people should “just sit on the sidelines until their time came.” As someone who has worked with youth for a just shy of a decade now…wait, what? Did I just type that? Wow. Time flies. Anyway, back on track.

I believe that it is so important that we understand and recognize that the young people in our churches are an important and vital part of the Body of Christ. (Just as any true believer is a vital and important part of the whole.)

We can be certain that children and teens can truly be a part of the family of God (have a personal faith in Jesus as savior) because of passages like Acts 11:14, 16:31-32, and 1 Corinthians 7:14. Additionally, Jesus values, loves, and accepts children in Matthew 19:14 when He says, “let the children come to me.”

It can also be surmised that a majority, or at least some, of the disciples, were in their teen years. We find evidence of this in Matthew 17:24-27 where both Jesus and Peter pay a temple tax, but the others are exempt from this tax because of their age. Many Jewish teenagers and young men would follow a Rabbi, learning from him and studying at his feet. This tradition is consistent with what we know about the disciples.

Another example of a young person having an active role in the church would be Timothy. Paul writes to Timothy, who was a young pastor, in the books of 1&2 Timothy. We know that Timothy was fairly young because in 1 Timothy 4:12 Paul writes, “Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity.” This tells us that although Timothy was still fairly young, many presume in his late teens, he still had an important role in the leadership of the church.

With all of these examples in mind, we need to remember that the church is made up of people of all ages, including children and teens. 1 Corinthians 12:12-27 tells us that there is, “one body, but many parts.”

The focus of this passage is that each and every member of the Body of Christ is important and has a role to fulfill.

This, of course, includes children and teens. Since young people are a part of the Body of Christ part of their role, just like the rest of the Body, would be to encourage, pray for, and love one another.

Ephesians 4:1-3 urges us all to, “walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.”

Additionally, Ephesians gives special instruction to people in particular ages and roles. Chapter 6:1 says, “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right.”

And, Paul’s instruction to Timothy in 1 Timothy 5:1 is a good and helpful reminder for anyone as well, particularly teens and young adults. “Do not rebuke an older man but encourage him as you would a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, younger women as sisters, in all purity.”

From all of these passages, I think we can safely produce a few principles regarding the roles of young people in the church.

  1. To be a fully-functioning disciple of Christ.
  2. To learn from those older than them.
  3. To respect those older than them.
  4. To encourage others regardless of age.
  5. To pray for others regardless of age.
  6. To share the Good News of the Gospel with others regardless of age.

Notice anything about those roles?

They seem to be applicable to any believer of any age.

Encourage one another, love one another, serve one another.