The Lion, The T-Rex, and The Movie Theater

There I was eyes wide, fingers buttery, with popcorn spilt across my chest, oohing and awing like a little kid…but let me give you some context.

My wife and I just recently saw the latest dinosaur movie, I forget its name, something like Jurassic Park: Return of the T-Rex Strikes Back. Honestly, I’m not sure how many of these movies there are, but I do know they will keep making them as long as the money keeps pouring in.

But I digress…the movie itself was very enjoyable. But it was one 2-second scene towards the end that captivated my attention. This particularly brief shot did not add much to the movie’s plot itself, but it did, however, send shivers down my spine and cause me to think about it hours after I had left the theater.

So, let me set it up for you, the dinosaurs have just broken free (spoilers, sorry…but the trailer kind of already gave that away) and the no-longer-extinct creatures are now running around places they don’t belong. Then suddenly the camera pans to the T-Rex’s feet which break down a sturdy metal fence as though it were made of toothpicks. There is a pan out and we see the entire T-Rex in all of its terror. He lets out an eardrum-rattling roar and then we see the full, wide angled shot. The T-Rex’s roar is met with an equally loud, but different and recognizable roar. We see a lion, standing defiantly on top of a cliff, face-to-face with the dinosaur king.

This is the shot that raised the hairs on the back on my neck. The King of the Jungle fearlessly facing off against a seemingly unstoppable foe.

As I sat and thought about this picture I couldn’t help but think about the day to day frustrations and problems that we face. When they come one at a time the problems may not seem too big. But problems, frustrations, and stresses all add up, and before you know it, we have a dino-sized weight dragging us down.

My favorite thing about imagery is that it helps us to wrap our minds around bigger and deeper truths. The Bible uses a lot of imagery as well. One picture that it paints is of God, specifically Jesus, as being the Lion of Judah. (Genesis 49, Isaiah 31, Revelation 4-5)

Pictured as the Lion, Jesus is unequaled in power, royalty, majesty, and triumph. He easily destroys His enemies and fervently protects His own. He is to be respected and feared, honored and worshiped.

C.S. Lewis chose a lion as the main character in his allegorical epic, The Chronicles of Narnia. And I believe that Lewis really gets to the point of it all when one of his characters, when speaking of the wonderful lion Aslan, says, “Safe?… Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King, I tell you.”

Our God is not safe, but He is good. He is the king, I tell you!

We can be sure of this, if we belong to Him, the Lion will fight for us.

Ephesians 6:12 tells us that our most terrible and overwhelming struggles are spiritual, not physical. And Romans 8 gives us wonderful news, “If God is for us, who can be against us?… Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword?… No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

No matter how big or scary the dinosaurs in our lives look and no matter how loud they roar, we must be confident that our Lion is still unquestionably the King.

 

The name of the Lord is a strong tower; the righteous man runs into it and is safe. -Proverbs 18:10

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